Green open access


#1

This is a proposed new standard glossary term. See this post for background on this review track. To comment on the term below either click the blue “Reply” button at the bottom or select a passage of text in the term and click the “Quote” pop-up to create a comment about that section only.

Short Definition: A type of open access where a version of a publication is freely available without incurring additional cost for this open access.

Extended Definition: The article is published in a journal and a copy of the article is deposited (self-archived) and made freely available via an institutional or subject repository is freely available to anyone to read or download. The publisher’s version in the journal is not usually open access. The version deposited in the repository is typically the authors’ accepted manuscript. There is no specific open access cost for the item in the repository to be open access though there may have been other publishing costs. Often the freely available version will be in a repository such as an institutional or subject repository. Publisher’s often demand an embargo in this type of open access. Publishers may also provide open access to the published version after an embargo. This is often referred to as “delayed hybrid open-access”.

Synonyms: Secondary open access, gratis open access

Acronym:

Related Terms:

Sources:

Term Lead: Valerie McCutcheon


#2

Possibly amend the short definition to clarify that we mean freely available via deposit in a repository as opposed to the formal published version on the publisher site - if everyone agrees that is what we mean? (HEFCE REF definition leans this way)


#3

Should we therefore include “Post-print” and “Author’s accepted manuscript” as related terms here?

Since the definitions elsewhere define open access as free to access and reuse, should we be avoiding potentially ambiguous terms like “freely available version” here? Could we replace with “the author’s accepted manuscript”, or just “open access publication” to be clearer?

Also on this point, the fact that “gratis open access” is a synonym for green OA suggests that green OA is not libre. Presumably we can deposit an AAM in an institutional repository and remove barriers to reuse by applying an appropriate license? Have I misunderstood?


#4

Thanks David. We will have a good think about these ideas and come back to you.


#5

A few thoughts from me:

  • agree with you Valerie that it is important to clarify that this is different to the version on the publisher site (which could also be made available ‘without incurring additional cost’ in the case of OA journals that don’t charge APCs)
  • Personally I would avoid bringing cost into this definition at all, or at least exclude it from the short definition. Green OA is not cost-free, obviously, and I don’t see the absence of a cost as being a key determinant of whether something is green OA. If a repository decided to charge a nominal fee of 5p per deposit would that mean articles in that repository ceased to be green OA?
  • first sentence of extended definition needs a bit of rewording (missing something between ‘subject repository’ and ‘is freely available’ I think.
  • Perhaps it’s unavoidable in this case, but I am wary of having ‘definitions’ which say things like ‘is not usually…’, as this then ceases to be a definition and just because description or commentary.
  • if we say ‘often the freely available version will be in a repository such as an institutional or subject repository’ then this implies that an article can be green OA without being in a repository. It also contradicts the first sentence which defines green OA as 'made freely available via an institutional or subject repository. Personally I think it is only green OA if in a repository (which of course then needs to be defined itself).
  • Open access archiving, and self-archiving should be listed as synonyms I think

#6

Is it worth having a synonym of “Self-archiving”


#7

confusing that this sentence
"Publishers may also provide open access to the published version after an embargo. This is often referred to as “delayed hybrid open-access”."
is part of the definition.

It should be noted that usually digital repositories are hosting / storing green open access works.


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